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Date

Tuesday 27th October, 2015

Time

5:30pm–8:30pm

Admission

public

Cost

free

Booking

required

Series

Friends of DWL Annual Lectures


Title

The Life of Friends in an Age of Revolutions: James Wodrow (1730-1810) and Samuel Kenrick (1728-1811)

Lecture

James Wodrow and Samuel Kenrick lived through one of the most turbulent periods in British and European history. Writing in 1805 Samuel observed that their correspondence which began over 54 years ago was ‘rarely to be found in epistolary correspondence.’ During that time they had lost none of their zest for exchanging the latest news about great events, the happenings in their locality and in their personal lives. The lecture will begin with an analysis of that letter, ten pages long, which reflected on their lives and their age. It will then discuss more generally the information which the friends thought significant enough to include in their letters and their often sharply differing views on current events.


Dr Martin Fitzpatrick, Aberystwyth University

Dr Martin Fitzpatrick

Martin Fitzpatrick was formerly Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Associate at the Department of History and Welsh history at Aberystwyth University. In 1977 he was co-founder with Dr D.O. Thomas of the Price-Priestley Newsletter and subsequently of Enlightenment and Dissent.  He remains co-editor of Enlightenment and Dissent, now an open access electronic journal published on the Centre website. He works on the history of ideas in the late eighteenth century, particularly relating to Enlightenment and Rational Dissenting thought. He is particularly interested in comparative dimensions of the English and Scottish Enlightenments. His current work includes editing, with Anthony Page and Emma Macleod, the Wodrow – Kenrick correspondence, and editing with Peter Jones a volume on the Reception of Burke in Europe, in Bloomsbury’s Reception Studies series. His publications have concerned the life and thought of Joseph Priestley and of Richard Price, Rational Dissent, especially its relationship with radicalism, the theme of toleration and the nature of the Enlightenment.